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U.S. CONGRESSMAN BILL JOHNSON Proudly Representing Eastern and Southeastern Ohio

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Congressman to EPA: Clean Up Your Own House

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Marietta, August 13, 2015 | comments
Ohio's sixth district congressman says he's hearing loud and clear comments from the public that the U.S. EPA needs to be reigned in.
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WTAP
By Todd Baucher
Published August 10, 2015

Ohio's sixth district congressman says he's hearing loud and clear comments from the public that the U.S. EPA needs to be reigned in.

That follows last week's announcement by the Obama administration of new guidelines for emissions from coal-fired power plants.

Republican Congressman Bill Johnson says recent news stories show the EPA needs to take care of its own problems.

"You've probably heard over the last couple of days, the EPA released over a million gallons of toxic water into a river in Colorado," Johnson said Monday. " (The amount of that spill is now reported at three million gallons.) My question is, who's going to fine the EPA? Who's going to shut the EPA down, and what are they going to do to clean up their own mess?"

The new guidelines announced last week are intended to reduce carbon dioxide emmissions by the year 2030.

Another shot fired in what states such as West Virginia and Ohio have called the "war on coal".

President Obama announces a plan to cut emissions from coal-fired power plants during the next 15 years.

The reaction, at least in West Virginia and Ohio, is predictable.
Officials from both states have vowed, as they did with a previous presidential proposal, to fight the new regulations in court.

It's the final version of the president's plan to cut back on carbon dioxide emissions from the nation's coal-fired power plants.

It requires a 32% cut by 2030, compared with 2005 levels-a stricter limit than had been expected.

"This regulatory scheme is only going to exacerbate the damage they've already done to our citizens," said West Virginia Attorney General Patrick Morrisey.

Across the river, the Ohio Coal association said in a statement, "The EPA did not consider the serious concerns from states regarding the president's proposals...and ignored countless invitations to come to coal country to hear from those most affected by it."

The statement goes on to say, "they, instead, added more stringent targets...and extended the deadline of the already unworkable plan."

And in a coal-related development, Alpha Natural Resources, which operates mines in West Virginia, is filing for chapter 11 bankruptcy protection.

It's the fourth major coal producer to do so within the last two years.
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