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Businesses will be affected by new emissions standards

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Youngstown, August 13, 2015 | comments
President Obama announced new rules to reduce the amount of pollution power plants can generate. This could have big implications for plants in the Buckeye State.
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WKBN
By Matt Horn
Published August 4, 2015


YOUNGSTOWN, Ohio (WKBN) – Big changes are in store for energy plants across the country.

On Monday, President Obama announced new rules to reduce the amount of pollution power plants can generate. This could have big implications for plants in the Buckeye State.

The new rule could save you money, but you’ll have to wait for close to 15 years before you actually see the extra money in your wallet. But, leaders across the state say this could have a negative impact on jobs across the country.

In a huge move, President Obama ordered major carbon pollution cuts for power companies, specifically impacting coal power plants.

“We are the first generation to feel the impact of climate change and one of the last generations who can do something about it,” Obama said in his speech.

The goal is to lower carbon emissions by 32 percent in the next 15 years to help reduce the country’s carbon footprint globally. President Obama says the goal is the same as taking 166 million cars off the road.

“The nerdier way to say that is we will be keeping 870 million tons of carbon dioxide pollution out of our atmosphere,” Obama said.

Parts of east and southeast Ohio will see big impacts with the rules. U.S. Congressman Bill Johnson said it means “more job losses in the energy sector, and as electricity prices increase, simple economics tells us it will lead to a rise in the price of many other goods.”

However, the Obama Administration says most Americans will save upwards of $85 on their bill. In Ohio, consumers are expected to save around $35 a bill.

Power companies don’t buy it, since renewable energy is still quite expensive to build. States will be held accountable at stricter rates starting in 2022.

There is an incentive program in place for states who start to rely on renewable energy early. Credits for electricity will come in 2020 and 2021 for projects that start construction after states send in their final plans to implement the changes.

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