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Bill Johnson on Proposed Iran Nuclear Agreement

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Washington, July 14, 2015 | Ben Keeler (330.337.6951) | comments
Congressman Bill Johnson (R-Marietta) released the following statement after the Obama Administration announced an agreement in nuclear negotiations with Iran:
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Congressman Bill Johnson (R-Marietta) released the following statement after the Obama Administration announced an agreement in nuclear negotiations with Iran:

“This morning, we woke up to learn that a deal had been struck, through a parade of American concessions,  to reduce the pressure on the world’s largest state sponsor of terror – an agreement that would legitimize the Iranian regime, and bring it ever closer to developing a nuclear weapon.

“From the initial reports I have read and briefings I have received on this agreement, ‘irresponsible’ seems like a generous way to describe the actions of the Obama Administration.  Iran is gleeful, and it appears they have reason to be. Sanctions would be lifted  and their nuclear program validated.  This agreement would not even require nuclear inspections at Iranian military sites. President Obama and his team could not even successfully negotiate the release of American political prisoners held by Iran as part of this “deal.” 

“Now, the world faces the troubling prospects of a nuclear arms race in the Middle East should this flawed agreement be finalized.  Iran’s neighbors – Saudi Arabia, Egypt, Turkey, and Jordan – will likely not sit idly by as the nuclear program of the region’s bully receives Washington’s stamp of approval. With ISIS pillaging large parts of the Middle East, the potential for more nuclear weapons there should give everyone pause.

“I have said many times during this process that no deal is preferable to a bad deal. Today, President Obama stated ‘because the stakes are so high, this is not the time for politics or posturing.’  I agree, and he should heed his own advice and let the process play out – and he should not start by threatening to veto any attempt by Congress to block the deal. The stakes of this deal are enormous for the world. Congress must review it, and if the proposed deal falls short in any critical aspect, especially in protecting America’s national security interests and the safety of the American people, it must be rejected.”

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